Abstract

EVALUATING SUCCESS FOR BEHAVIORAL CHANGE IN DIABETES VIA MHEALTH AND GAMIFICATION: MYSUGR'S KEYS TO RETENTION AND PATIENT ENGAGEMENT
Speaker: Kyle K.J. Rose
Author: K.J. Rose1, M. König2,3, F. Wiesbauer4
Affiliation: 1Health Care Management, INSEAD Social Innovation Centre, Fontainebleau, France, 2Pediatrics, Diabetology, 3Pediatrics, Dermatology, General Hospital of Vienna, 4Internal Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
Session: E-POSTER SESSION 4 AT E-POSTER STATION 2
Date: Friday - March 01, 2013 10:00-10:30
Location: POSTER AREA
Subtopic: E-POSTER SESSION 4 AT E-POSTER STATION 2
Topic: 1 Mar
Background: Mobile health is a new path to help people with diabetes with decision-support, data-gathering and behavioral modification. Maintaining a diabetes journal/logbook is an integral tool for optimal diabetes-therapy. Sadly, it is also one of the least rewarding ones in day-to-day life. Approximately 73% of people with diabetes do not document 1, and 57% 2 of the data documented is falsely entered. Applying game mechanics to this undesirable task is a way to increase engagement, reward reuse and motivate change.
Objective: The objective is to change users' behavioral habits for diabetes management using smartphone apps targeting increased blood glucose testing, exercise, and better nutrition, and retaining these habits.
Case/method: The application mySugr is a registered class-I medical device in EU. Twenty T1DM patients participated in the usability engineering study (IEC62366:2007). Retention of patient engagement was measured via each diabetic's individual activity level on the app platform (mid-term focus: 1-3 month retention), in addition to other self-reported metrics such as HbA1c.
Results (Reported/observed):
  • Retention among users (still active users)
    • 1 Month: 95%
    • 2 Months: 90%
    • 3 Months: 85%
  • Testing frequency: +10-20%
  • HbA1c-change: -0.4-1.1%
  • Self-reported improvement in QOL/BOD
Conclusion: The proposed mobile health app engaged this group of T1DM patients and maintained engagement long enough for changes in psychological factors: developing diabetes management habits. The high levels of retention achieved are likely responsible for the self-reported clinical outcomes including reduction of HbA1c, however a longer study is required to understand which aspects triggered change.